Tag Archives: persistence

Long journeys

Between them, they had gone a good way to the Moon. I am talking about those three vehicles standing gallantly on display. The first was an Austin Twenty that had been driven from England to Cape Town and back in between 1932 and 1935. The second was also an Austin and  had managed the route from the North Cape in northern Norway again to South Africa in 1955. Some say this is the longest road in the world. But the real trooper was a very battered Range Rover that in 1977 had struggled from Anchorage, Alaska to Cape Horn along the Pan American Highway. It has to be said this term is a misnomer as the route took 7 months to conquer. The worst was a mere 100 miles across the Darien Isthmus that accounted for 4 months of the journey time. The struggle through the dense jungle can only be imagined from the dents in the vehicle’s ‘fuselage’. Proof if any is needed that the slow and persistent beats the fast and easy.

Let us pray

Lord Jesus, help me in the jungles of life
To struggle to get through
Guide me on the easy roads
To want to get through

Amen

Writing the answer

He prayed on his knees. He prayed standing. He prayed sitting. But he had never heard the voice of God.

 

So he started to write down his prayers. At first no more than a few lines – big issues and real problems. He still heard nothing. Yet he wrote on, enjoying the confidence of pen and paper. Page after page, notebook after notebook were filled with the intimacies of his deepest thoughts and desires. But yet he sensed no answer.

Continue reading Writing the answer

Four ways to do evangelism

Many people have slipped into the mindset that evangelism is a gift that some believers have and others do not. The reality is that when someone becomes reconciled to God, He sends them out to reconcile others.

That’s not a gift—we all have the responsibility to take Christ to others.

Continue reading Four ways to do evangelism

What Hamilton’s victory teaches the Church?

It was great to see Lewis Hamilton win the British Grand Prix as Silverstone this weekend. Of course, no one doubts that his podium position was the result of talent, teamwork and courage. But there is another quality in that mix; it is persistence. Since Mercedes, a few seasons back, had all sorts of technical problems with its cars yet sheer doggedness has turned the situation around to victory.

 

Most congregations are constantly trying to innovate yet never quite succeed. Why? Maybe we don’t persist in working though the hurdles in the way of any change. Yet if the idea was right in the first place, dogged determination will defeat these difficulties and win the race.

Remembering hands

A few years ago, when my mother was visiting, she asked me to go shopping with her because she needed a new dress. I don’t normally like to go shopping with other people, and I’m not a patient person, but we set off for the mall together nonetheless.

We visited nearly every store that carried ladies’ dresses, and my mother tried on dress after dress, rejecting them all. As the day wore on, I grew weary and my mother grew frustrated.

Finally, at our last stop, my mother tried on a lovely blue three-piece dress. The blouse had a bow at the neckline, and as I stood in the dressing room with her, I watched as she tried, with much difficulty, to tie the bow. Her hands were so badly crippled from arthritis that she couldn’t do it. Immediately, my impatience gave way to an overwhelming wave of compassion for her. I turned away to try and hide the tears that welled up involuntarily. Regaining my composure, I turned back to tie the bow for her. The dress was beautiful, and she bought it. Our shopping trip was over, but the event was etched indelibly in my memory.

For the rest of the day, my mind kept returning to that moment in the dressing room and to the vision of my mother’s hands trying to tie that bow. Those loving hands that had fed me, bathed me, dressed me, caressed and comforted me, and, most of all, prayed for me, were now touching me in the most remarkable manner.

Later in the evening, I went to my mother’s room, took her hands in mine, kissed them and, much to her surprise, told her that to me they were the most beautiful hands in the world.

I’m so grateful that God let me see with new eyes what a precious, priceless gift a loving, self-sacrificing mother is. I can only pray that some day my hands, and my heart, will have earned such a beauty of their own.

By Bev Hulsizer from Chicken Soup for the Christian Soul Copyright 1997 by Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen, Patty Aubery and Nancy Mitchell