Can you risk looking foolish?

It all started one afternoon, in a small village in Tanga, Tanzania, when Erasto Mpemba and his friends were making ice cream. After making the dairy mixture, they had to put it in the freezer. There was one freezer in the village, they had to take turns using it.

Like most kids, Mpemba did not like waiting. One day, Erasto put his hot milk in the freezer without waiting for it to cool down. Other kids were already cooling theirs, but he could not wait.

After a little while, Erasto checked his ice cream in the freezer. To his shock, it had already frozen. Faster than his friends who cooled mixture first.

“You have stolen my ice cream,” one kid accused him. Erasto’s denial could not quench the accusation. His friends now labeled him a thief.

Determined to clear his name, the following day Erasto set to prove hot milk freezes faster than cold milk. It was absurd. Erasto put containers of the same size in the freezer, one with hot milk and the other with cold. Lo and behold, the hot mixture froze faster.

Elated that he has made a scientific discovery, Erasto shared his observation with the only physics authority he knew, his high school teacher at Magamba Secondary School, Tanzania.

“You were confused, that cannot happen”.
After Erasto finished his Ordinary level, he went for Advanced level where he studied physics. Erasto was relentless, he asked his physics teacher why hot water froze faster. Again, the teacher called him a confused boy.

“Boy, you did not understand Newton’s law of cooling.”

In his Advanced Level class, Erasto learned the scientific process. Erasto repeated his experiment using standard scientific practices. Again, there was more ice in the initially hot water than cold.

“If the teacher says you are wrong, then you are wrong,” Erasto later said in an interview.

When critics were shouting the loudest, something happened that forever changed Erasto’s life. In the late 1960s, Dennis Osborne, a physicist, was invited for a talk at Erasto’s school, Mkhawa Secondary School. Do not ask the professor your stupid questions, the physics teacher told Erasto.

After Dennis Osborne’s speech, students were invited to ask questions. Unfortunately, Erasto had been gagged. But it was not for long. Erasto disobeyed his teacher and repeated his question to Dennis Osborne.

There was a riot in the class. Erasto’s classmates viewed his curiosity as anathema, a cancerous growth that had to be suppressed by all means. The teacher wrongly assumed Erasto had asked to embarrass Dr. Osborne.

Although Dr. Osborne promised to look at the problem, he did not believe it was possible. It was not logical. Decreasing temperature from 68°F to 32°F should be faster than decreasing from 212°F, Dr. Osborne thought. Since he had made a promise, he repeated the experiment in his lab.

After graduating from high school, Erasto and Dennis Osborne published a scientific paper. Erasto’s observation is now called Mpemba effect. To date, no one knows exactly what causes Mpemba effect.

In 2012, Royal Society of Chemistry invited scientists across the globe to write an essay on possible explanation of Mpemba effect. They were more than 22,000 entries. This is how important a young boy’s 1963 observation in a small village has become.

Although Mpemba effect is illogical, it is true. Erasto might never know why hot water freezes faster than cold water, but his curiosity inspires thousands of young people in Africa. Again, his name has been forever inscribed in the annals of physics. At times, success is asking dumb questions and watch other people look for the answer.

Are you willing to be foolish?

 

(Extract from: The chronicles of the kid next door blog)

You are not what you eat!

We are what we don’t eat!

 Acts 11.1-18

Matthew 5.1-12

I have to say I have never watched it myself. But I am told that the programme – I’m a celebrity get me out of here- usually contains a scene where the contestants have to eat something disgusting. In a way I can sympathies with their reaction having once had to eat octopus tentacles on an official visit to Spain. Actually chopped into slices and deep-fried they are delicious. Yet such experiences raise the whole question what we like to eat and what we don’t, what we think we should eat for our health and not and, indeed, what we should and not eat for religious reasons. For such deliberations brings us to the heart of today’s lessons not just from Acts but Matthew as well.

 

 

So let’s start with Peter. Now he could be a black or white sort of guy. Moreover, he saw details as the foundation of the bigger picture. Even small things could either be seriously right or wrong for him. Thus, pre-Joppa, he knew exactly what he had to eat to be God fearing. He knew what all who obeyed God should eat if they were to be on the inside. In fact, he was trying to do religion then by paying attention to the little rules and hoping the bigger ones would take of themselves.

 

That’s why his vision that day at Joppa came to him as a huge surprise. Certainly, if he hadn’t had this revelation, Christianity would have faded out as a footnote in Jewish history. But that day he was given the keys to the Kingdom; he was made to see what the nub of every religion is all about. He was shown what the sacred must truly be founded on. He was made aware that what really matters to God is often not detail. Rather it is have a go at living the truly good life. It is having a bash at obeying God in a way that serves the big picture. Put directly, it is attempting no matter how unsuccessfully to live out not the minutae of religious observance but the beatitudes of faith.

 

Ah we say – but the beatitudes are not easy. Much easier to be concerned with what we can and cannot eat – what formula of rules we can obey to the letter – what boundary walls we can erect to keep people in or out. Since being poor in spirit and peacemakers and above all merciful are painful. Let’s not even start on being pure in heart! That’s just too hard! In the final analysis we say – the beatitudes are just impossible!

 

 

But, you know, the word ‘impossible’ is a strangely flexible sort of term. Since the famous science fiction writer Arthur C. Clarke proposed three “laws” of prediction. These are known worldwide as “Clarke’s Three Laws.” Here they are:

Law 1- when a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.

Law 2 – The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture a little way past them into the impossible.

Law 3 – Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

 

If we say then that the beatitudes are impossible we are very probably wrong.

 

If we say trying to base our life rules on them will test us to the limit then we are right. But so is venturing beyond them. For then we will discover the possibilities of God.

 

If indeed we say the casting aside of our self imposed boundaries is impossible we forget Christ did magic – it’s just we call them – miracles.

 

And where do we need miracles today?

 

Oh there are a hundred and one such places!

 

Let me take the example I heard of only last week. For Cardinal Vincent Nicols has just returned from Iraq. He remarked that until recently that country was an intricate pattern of religions and faiths. Sadly, this relatively harmonious patchwork has been destroyed and the lives of Christians as well as other minorities are now at serious risk.

 

Here then in at least one place is where we need miracles. Miracles brought about not by obeying to the letter some rule or other. Instead miracles ushered in by living, offering and inviting others into the community of the beatitudes. Miracles opened up by casting barriers aside and embracing our common humanity under God. Because that is the only way to value all human beings no matter what they believe or where they come from.

 

Or as Maya Angelou wrote of the human family:

 

I note the obvious differences
in the human family.
Some of us are serious,
some thrive on comedy.

Some declare their lives are lived
as true profundity,
and others claim they really live
the real reality.

I’ve sailed upon the seven seas
and stopped in every land,
I’ve seen the wonders of the world
not yet one common man.

I know ten thousand women
called Jane and Mary Jane,
but I’ve not seen any two
who really were the same.

We are more alike, my friends,
than we are unalike.

 

We are more alike, my friends,
than we are unalike.

 

So, how do we sum up?

 

Well, I think we need to acknowledge we are less what we eat than who we eat with.

 

We are less Christian when we obey rules and ignore God’s vision.

 

We are less human when we stop believing in miracles – the beatitude miracles – the miracle of the vision of Joppa – the miracles we can make happen through Christ. Since that is the food of God and the very taste of heaven!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What’s inside us?

There was a man who made living selling balloons at a fair. He had all colors of balloons Including red, yellow, green. Whenever business was slow, he would release a helium filled balloons into the air and when the children saw it go up, they all wanted to buy one. They would come up to him, buy a balloon and his sales would go up again. He continues this process all day.

One day, he felt something tugging his jacket. He turned around and saw a little boy who asked,” If you release a black balloon, would that also fly?” Moved by the boy’s concern, the man replied with empathy.” Son, it is not the Color of the balloon, it is what inside that makes it go up.”

The same thing applies to our lives. It is what is inside that counts. The thing inside of us that makes us go up is our attitude.

 

From ‘Morning with Dilbert’ blog

An Old Geezer

An old geezer, who had been a retired farmer for a long time, became very bored and decided to open a medical clinic. He put a sign up outside that said: Dr. Geezer’s clinic. “Get your treatment for $500, if not cured get back $1,000.”

Mister “Younger” who was positive that this old geezer didn’t know beans about medicine, thought this would be a great opportunity to get $1,000.

So he went to Dr. Geezer’s clinic.

This is what transpired.

Mr Younger: “Dr. Geezer, I have lost all taste in my mouth.” can you please help me ??
Dr. Geezer:  “Nurse, please bring medicine from box 22 and put 3 drops in Dr. Young’s mouth.”

Mr Younger: Aaagh !! — “This is Gasoline!”

Dr. Geezer: “Congratulations! You’ve got your taste back. That will be $500.”

Mr Younger gets annoyed and goes back after a couple of days figuring to recover his money.

Mr Younger: “I have lost my memory, I cannot remember anything.”

Dr. Geezer: “Nurse, please bring medicine from box 22 and put 3 drops in the patient’s mouth.”

Mr Younger: “Oh no you don’t,  —  that is Gasoline!”

Dr. Geezer: “Congratulations! You’ve got your memory back. That will be $500.”

Mr Younger (after having lost $1000) leaves angrily and comes back after several more days.

Mr Younger: “My eyesight has become weak  —  I can hardly see !!!!

Dr. Geezer: “Well, I don’t have any medicine for that so —  ”

Here’s your $1000 back.”

Mr Younger: “But this is only $500…”

Dr. Geezer: “Congratulations! You got your vision back! That will be $500.”

Moral of story  —  Just because you’re “Younger” doesn’t mean that you can outsmart an old “Geezer “